Home Remedies: What Works – Home remedies need

Home Remedies: What Works – Home remedies need

Regardless of what you have heard or how badly you need relief, talk to your physician or pharmacist before trying any home remedy. This is even more important if you take over-the-counter or prescription drugs, because some may affect how drugs work. And bear in mind that many do not have any research to back them up.

Home Remedies

Peppermint

Mint has been used for centuries as a health treatment. Peppermint oil may help with irritable bowel syndrome — a long-term illness which may lead to cramps, gas, bloating, diarrhoea, and constipation — and it can be good for headaches also. More studies are needed to see how much it helps and why. People today use the foliage for other states, also, but there is very little evidence that it helps with some of these.

Honey

This natural sweetener can work just as well to get a cough as over-the-counter medications. That could be particularly useful for children who aren’t old enough to take those. But do not give it to a baby or a toddler younger than 1. There is a small risk of a rare but serious sort of food poisoning which could be harmful for them. And while you might have heard that”neighbourhood” honey can help with allergies, studies do not back that up.

Turmeric

This spice has been hyped as having the ability to help with an assortment of ailments from arthritis to fatty liver. There’s some early research to support this. Other claims, such as curing ulcers and assisting with skin rashes after radiation are lacking evidence. If you try it, do not overdo it: High doses may cause digestive issues.

Ginger

It has been used for thousands of years in Asian medicine to treat stomachaches, diarrhoea, and nausea, and studies show that it works for nausea and vomiting. There is some evidence that it may help with menstrual cramps, also. However, it’s not necessarily great for everyone. Some folks get stomach trouble, heartburn, diarrhoea, and gas for this, and it can affect how some medicines work. So speak with your physician, and use it with caution.

Sex

No more, “Not tonight, Dear.” It turns out that sex can help alleviate pain when you have certain sorts of headaches — especially migraines. It has also been shown to increase heart health, ease stress, and boost mental alertness.

Green Tea

This comforting beverage does more than keep you alert and awake. It’s an excellent source of some strong antioxidants that may protect your cells from damage and help you fight disease. It might even lower your chances of cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancers, like breast, skin, breast, and colon.

Garlic

Some studies show that those who consume more garlic are not as likely to get certain types of cancer (garlic supplements do not appear to have an identical effect). Additionally, it may lower blood glucose and blood pressure levels, but it does not appear to help that much.

Chicken Soup

Turns out, Grandma was right: Chicken soup could be good for a cold. Studies show that it can alleviate symptoms and help you eliminate them sooner. Additionally, it curbs swelling and clears nasal fluids.

Neti Pot

You set a warm and saltwater mixture in something which looks like a small teapot. Then pour it through a single nostril and let it drain out the other. You must practice a bit, but when you get the hang of it, it may ease cold or allergy symptoms and might even help you get rid of a cold faster. Just ensure to use distilled or cooled boiled water and maintain your neti pot clean.

Cinnamon

You might have heard it can help control blood sugar for individuals that have prediabetes or diabetes. But there is no evidence that it does anything for any medical condition. If you’re planning to try it, be cautious: Cinnamon extracts may be bad for your liver in huge doses.

Home Remedies

Hot Bath

It’s excellent for all sorts of things that influence your muscles, bones, and tendons (the cells that connect your muscles to your bones), such as arthritis, back pain, and joint pain. And warm water can help get blood circulation to regions that need it, so gently stretch and operate those areas as you’re in there. But do not make it too hot, especially for those who have a skin condition. The best temperature is between 92 and 100 F.

Ice Pack

Use a bag of frozen peas or merely a plastic bag or wet towel with ice in the first 48 hours following an injury to assist with swelling and pain. You are also able to use it on injuries that cause swelling and pain over and over again — but only after physical activity, not before. Never use ice for over 20 minutes, and take it off if your skin becomes red.

Take Care

Regardless of what you have heard or how badly you need relief, talk to your physician or pharmacist before trying any home remedy. This is even more important if you take over-the-counter or prescription drugs, because some may affect how drugs work. And bear in mind that many do not have any research to back them up.

Peppermint

Mint has been used for centuries as a health treatment. Peppermint oil may help with irritable bowel syndrome — a long-term illness which may lead to cramps, gas, bloating, diarrhoea, and constipation — and it can be good for headaches also. More studies are needed to see how much it helps and why. People today use the foliage for other states, also, but there is very little evidence that it helps with some of these.

Honey

This natural sweetener can work just as well to get a cough as over-the-counter medications. That could be particularly useful for children who aren’t old enough to take those. But do not give it to a baby or a toddler younger than 1. There is a small risk of a rare but serious sort of food poisoning which could be harmful for them. And while you might have heard that”neighbourhood” honey can help with allergies, studies do not back that up.

Turmeric

This spice has been hyped as having the ability to help with an assortment of ailments from arthritis to fatty liver. There’s some early research to support this. Other claims, such as curing ulcers and assisting with skin rashes after radiation are lacking evidence. If you try it, do not overdo it: High doses may cause digestive issues.

Ginger

It has been used for thousands of years in Asian medicine to treat stomachaches, diarrhoea, and nausea, and studies show that it works for nausea and vomiting. There is some evidence that it may help with menstrual cramps, also. However, it’s not necessarily great for everyone. Some folks get stomach trouble, heartburn, diarrhoea, and gas for this, and it can affect how some medicines work. So speak with your physician, and use it with caution.

Sex

No more, “Not tonight, Dear.” It turns out that sex can help alleviate pain when you have certain sorts of headaches — especially migraines. It has also been shown to increase heart health, ease stress, and boost mental alertness.

Green Tea

This comforting beverage does more than keep you alert and awake. It’s an excellent source of some strong antioxidants that may protect your cells from damage and help you fight disease. It might even lower your chances of cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancers, like breast, skin, breast, and colon.

Garlic

Some studies show that those who consume more garlic are not as likely to get certain types of cancer (garlic supplements do not appear to have an identical effect). Additionally, it may lower blood glucose and blood pressure levels, but it does not appear to help that much.

Chicken Soup

Turns out, Grandma was right: Chicken soup could be good for a cold. Studies show that it can alleviate symptoms and help you eliminate them sooner. Additionally, it curbs swelling and clears nasal fluids.

Neti Pot

You set a warm and saltwater mixture in something which looks like a small teapot. Then pour it through a single nostril and let it drain out the other. You must practice a bit, but when you get the hang of it, it may ease cold or allergy symptoms and might even help you get rid of a cold faster. Just ensure to use distilled or cooled boiled water and maintain your neti pot clean.

Cinnamon

You might have heard it can help control blood sugar for individuals that have prediabetes or diabetes. But there is no evidence that it does anything for any medical condition. If you’re planning to try it, be cautious: Cinnamon extracts may be bad for your liver in huge doses.

Hot Bath

It’s excellent for all sorts of things that influence your muscles, bones, and tendons (the cells that connect your muscles to your bones), such as arthritis, back pain, and joint pain. And warm water can help get blood circulation to regions that need it, so gently stretch and operate those areas as you’re in there. But do not make it too hot, especially for those who have a skin condition. The best temperature is between 92 and 100 F.

Ice Pack

Use a bag of frozen peas or merely a plastic bag or wet towel with ice in the first 48 hours following an injury to assist with swelling and pain. You are also able to use it on injuries that cause swelling and pain over and over again — but only after physical activity, not before. Never use ice for over 20 minutes, and take it off if your skin becomes red.

Petroleum Jelly

This is used for numerous things: It can help your skin maintain its moisture and protect against chafing — on the inside of your thighs when you operate, for example. Additionally, it can help protect your child’s skin from diaper rash.

Source: Sincere thanks to WebMD.com

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